Editorial Comment to the September 2014 Issue of IMARS Highlights

 

Editorial comments

This issue publishes three interesting articles. The first article written by Prof. Alejandro Gugliucci at Touro University-California, USA, summarizes updated pathophysiology of glycation signals (RAGE-AGEs) in kidney disease, especially chronic kidney disease (CKD). The number of CKD patients is dramatically increasing in all developed counties, thus this article will help the readers to understand the pathophysiological contribution of glycation (or glycative stress) in kidney homeostasis.

The second article written by Prof. Masako Toda at Paul-Ehrlich-Institute, Germany, highlights the impact of glycation of a food allergen against immune response. She summarizes the mechanism how the glycation of ovalbumin, a major egg white allergen, alters the T cell activation as well as antigen presenting pathway.

The third article written by Katsumasa Iijima at Nippi Research Institute of Biomatrix, Japan, summarizes that glyoxal derived AGEs at arginine residues, such as N-carboxymethylarginine (CMA) and hydroimidazolones (G-Hs), cross-convert with each other in various conditions, indicating the complicated effect of glycation (AGE formation and structure) in arginine against protein homeostasis.

  The IMARS Highlights editors look forward to your contribution to the field of food and medical glycation researches as always. Please contact us.

Reiko Inagi, PhD

Division of Chronic Kidney Disease Pathophysiology,

The University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine

email: [email protected]

 

 

Next ISMR

12th International Symposium on the Maillard Reaction

1st. Iberoamerican Symposium on AGEs

1st. Iberoamerican Symposium on AGEs

The only event specialized in Advanced Glycation End Products in Latin America will take place from 1 to 3 October 2014 in beautiful and historical, Guanajuato, Mexico.

Spearheaded by founding members of IMARS, the international Symposium is organized by researchers at the University of Guanajuato, Universidad de Chile, Touro University (California) and Mount Sinai (New York).

Mark the date and update your knowledge of nutrition!

The modernization of our society has brought profound changes in lifestyle and also a progressive increase in chronic diseases such as obesity, metabolic syndrome and diabetes. The frequency of these diseases has reached almost epidemic levels and there is urgency to find solutions that can stop these processes.

Diet is undoubtedly an important component of modern lifestyle that singly or in combination may play an important role in the initiation of these diseases. Recent research suggests a strong relationship between blood levels of so-called Advanced Glycation End Products or AGEs and these diseases. AGEs are a highly heterogeneous group of compounds that can be generated within the body itself or ingested preformed in foods depending mainly on how to cook.

These diseases are highly prevalent in Mexico and other Spanish-speaking countries and it is time to start discussing in detail potential solutions to this problem in the region. The role of AGEs in the generation of diabetes and other chronic diseases will be the focus of discussion in this symposium. The purpose is to bring together researchers in this issue of the Latin American world and try to reach consensus on what is really established and new research ideas should be developed. We hope that this symposium is just the beginning of regular meetings of this group of Latin American researchers to discuss progress and then spread the message of IMARS in Spanish for the benefit of medical doctors, researchers, nutritionists and the patients in the area.


Please visit the website below:

http://www.agesenlasalud.com/

Editorial Comment to the July 2014 Issue of IMARS Highlights

Editorial comments

This issue includes four articles regarding updated pathophysiology of glycation (or AGEs) and biochemistry of glycated products. Profs. Amelia Fotheringham and Josephine M. Forbes at University of Queensland, Australia, propose the importance of further investigation to understand the clearance mechanism of AGEs in the body in their articles. The article written by Profs. Allison M. Manuel and Norma Frizzell at University of South Carolina School of Medicine, USA, highlights the impact of protein succination on regulation of oxidative stress signal Keap1/Nrf2 pathway, especially in adipose tissue.

Other two articles focus on biochemistry of the glycation, or Maillard reaction. In particular, Prof. Anja K.K. Rahn at McGill University, Canada, summarizes the influence of salt on the Maillard reaction in the filed of food science. And, the article written by Profs. Hirohito Watanabe and Fumitaka Hayase at Meiji University, Japan, summarizes the updated knowledge regarding blue pigments dereived from Maillard reaction, especially Blue-M1.

The IMARS Highlights editors look forward to your contribution to the field of food and medical glycation researches as always. Please contact us.

Reiko Inagi, PhD

Division of Chronic Kidney Disease Pathophysiology,

The University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine

email: [email protected]

Editorial Comment to the May 2014 Issue of IMARS Highlights

Editorial comments

In this issue, we selected the three mini review articles written by active Maillard researchers in the field of plant science as well as food and medical sciences. The first article is a mini review written by Prof. Chikahiro Miyake and his colleague at Kobe University, Japan, entitled “Dicarbonyl stress in photosynthetic organisms”. They summarized the production and detoxification mechanisms of dicarbonyls in photosynthetic organisms such as cyanobacteria and higher plants. Especially, they described that dicarbonyls, such as methylglyxal, glyoxal, and 3-deoxyglucosone, are mainly produced by the glycolysis in respiration and Calvin cycle in photosynthesis. They also summarized the dicarbonyl detoxification systems, including glyoxalase system, in the plant.

The second article is a mini review written by Prof. Frédéric J Tessier and his colleagues at Institut Polytechnique LaSalle Beauvais, France, entitled “Open questions around the Carboxymethyllysine”. They updated the understanding about carboxymethyllysine (CML), a representative key marker of the Maillard reaction in food and disease. Further, they give us the important questions regarding CML, which have to be addressed in a future research. 

The third article entitled “The effects of odor generated from protein digests and reducing sugars by the Maillard reaction on blood pressure” is a memorial review written by Dr. Motoko Ohata, a winner of Young Investigator Award of the 23nd Japanese Maillard Reaction Society (JMARS) meeting held on November 29 in Osaka last year. This article highlighted that some odor components generated from protein digests and xylose by the Maillard reaction have hypotensive activity in rats.

The IMARS Highlights editors look forward to your contribution to the field of food and medical glycation researches as always. Please contact us.

Reiko Inagi, PhD

Division of Chronic Kidney Disease Pathophysiology,

The University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine

email: [email protected]

Editorial Comment to the March 2014 Issue of IMARS Highlights

Editorial comments

This issue publishes the articles of three active Maillard researchers. The first article is a mini review written by Prof. Kiyotaka Nakagawa at Tohoku University, Japan, entitled “Biological roles of Amadori-glycated phosphatidylethanolamine: involvement of lipid glycation in the development of diabetic complications”. Recent evidence emphasizes the involvement of lipid glycation and lipid oxidation in diabetic complications. Prof. Nakagawa summarized the biological impact of the glycated lipids, especially Amadori- phosphatidylethanolamine, leading to disorders of cellular integrity, which contributes to development of diabetic complications.   

The second article is a mini review written by Profs. Sung Min Son and Inhee Mook-Jung at Seoul National University, Korea, entitled “The interaction of Advanced Glycation Endproducts (AGEs) with the receptor (RAGE): Implication for Alzheimer’s disease”. They updated the understanding about the effect of AGEs and RAGE in pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. Further, they focused on the benefits of the blockade of AGEs-RAGE axis as a promising therapeutic target.

The third article entitled “Development of simple assay method for screening of AGE inhibiters and the effect of the candidates on AGEs formation” is a memorial review written by Dr. Yukio Fujiwara, a winner of Young Investigator Award of the 23nd Japanese Maillard Reaction Society (JMARS) meeting held on November 29 in Osaka last year. In this article, he summarized the establishment of ELISA system, which is able to measure amount of several specific AGEs structure (CML, CMA and Pentosidine) and the usefulness of the ELISA system to indentify novel AGE inhibitors.    

The IMARS Highlights editors look forward to your contribution to the field of food and medical glycation researches as always. Please contact us.

Reiko Inagi, PhD

Division of Chronic Kidney Disease Pathophysiology,
The University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine

email: [email protected]

IMARS HIGHLIGHTS: AVAILABLE THE JANUARY, 2014 ISSUE OF IMARS HIGHLIGHTS

On behalf of IMARS president, Prof. Teruo Miyazawa, the editorial office expresses the greetings of the new year, 2014.

This New Year special issue includes a mini review written by Prof. Shing Hwa Liu, entitled “Advanced glycation end products and osteoarthritis”.

Osteoarthritis is one of the most prevalent and chronic musculoskeletal diseases, which is predominantly caused by aging and glycative stress. Recent studies highlighted that osteoarthritis is associated with abnormal accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in articular cartilage, leading to the stiffness and brittleness of cartilage. This review article summarizes the impact of the accumulation of AGEs in human articular cartilage in the development of osteoarthritis and the future possibility of therapeutic approaches targeting cartilage AGEs.

The second special article entitled “Novel Mass Spectrometric Tools for the Search of New Maillard Products and AGEs” is written by Prof. Monika Pischetsrieder, a Contributing Editors of the IMARS Highlights, at University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany. In this review article, she introduced two complementary mass spectrometry methods, MALDI-TOF-MS and UHPLC-MSMS, which have been developed to search for new structures of food-derived Maillard products. These novel dietary AGEs will open a new avenue to understand the nutritional and toxicological effects of glycation in food.

The third article is a conference report of the Glyoxalase centennial meeting written by Prof. Masanari Itokawa at Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo, Japan. This memorial meeting was organized by Profs. Naila Rabbani and Paul Thornalley, who are well-established glyoxalase researchers, and was held on November 27-29 in University of Warwick, UK, last year. I am delighted that this article can remind you of “History of 100 Years of Glyoxalase Research”.

The IMARS Highlights editors look forward to your contribution to the field of food and medical glycation researches as always. Please contact us.

Reiko Inagi, PhD

Division of Nephrology and Endocrinology
University of Tokyo, School of Medicine

email: [email protected]

IMARS HIGHLIGHTS: AVAILABLE THE NOVEMBER, 2013 ISSUE OF IMARS HIGHLIGHTS

Accumulating evidence significantly emphasizes the link between glycative stress, metabolic stress and oxidative stress. These stress networks are closely implicated in various disease manifestations in a number of different contexts. In other words, to regulate and optimize the stress network state would be beneficial to maintain the cellular function, or cellular homeostasis. The fist article written by Prof. Jun Hirose at Kumamoto University, Japan in this issue specially focused on the link between glycative stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which is induced by ER dysfunction, and its pathophysiology in cartilage degeneration.

Further, this issue includes the article entitled “The TU Dresden database for glycation compounds in food” by Prof. Anke Förster at Universität Dresden, Germany. In this article, Prof. Förster introduced the usefulness of “TUD-AGE-database”, which provides web-based data collection of Maillard reaction products in foods. This database helps us to summarize the current knowledge about glycation compounds in foods.

The third article is a memorial article written by Dr. Airi Jo at The University of Tokyo, Japan, a winner of Young Investigator Award of the 22nd Japanese Maillard Reaction Society (JMARS) meeting held on December 21-22 in Tokyo last year. She demonstrated that glyoxalase I protected the vascular endothelial cells against aging via modulation of age-related glycative stress and subsequent enhancement of eNOS phosphorylation.

The IMARS Highlights editors look forward to submission of your articles related to glycation in the field of food and medical sciences as always. Please contact us.

Reiko Inagi, PhD

Division of Nephrology and Endocrinology
University of Tokyo, School of Medicine

email[email protected]

IMARS HIGHLIGHTS: AVAILABLE THE SEPTEMBER, 2013 ISSUE OF IMARS HIGHLIGHTS

The first review article of this issue is written by Prof. Kei Fukami. Prof. Fukami at Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume, Japan, focused on the link between glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and AGEs-RAGE axis in diabetic nephropathy. GLP-1 is of current interest as a gut hormone lowering the blood glucose. He summarized the novel beneficial effect of GLP-1 on diabetic nephropathy by lowering the activation of AGEs-RAGE axis.

The second article is a memorial article by Dr. Naoto Koyama at Institute for Innovation, Ajinomoto Co., Inc., a winner of Young Investigator Award of the 22nd Japanese Maillard Reaction Society (JMARS) meeting held on December 21-22 in Tokyo last year. He demonstrated in vitro and in vivo vascular effects (vasodilative activity) of L-Arg-derived AGE, imidazolone such as MG-H1.

Further, this issue includes the article entitled “Dietary advanced glycation end products as an environmental contributor to type 1 diabetes” by Dr. Danielle J Borg at Mater Medical Research Institute, Queensland, Australia. This article focused on the impact of dietary AGEs on development of type 1 diabetes.

From this issue, Dr. Yukio Fujiwara, a new contributing editor, compiles “Papers of Editors’ Choice” in the section of Highlights of the glycation literature. This new effort will give you updated and valuable information.

The IMARS Highlights editors look forward to submission of your articles related to glycation in the field of food and medical sciences as always. Please contact us!

Reiko Inagi, PhD
Division of Nephrology and Endocrinology
University of Tokyo, School of Medicine

email: [email protected]

IMARS HIGHLIGHTS: AVAILABLE THE JULY, 2013 ISSUE OF IMARS HIGHLIGHTS

This issue published two interesting mini reviews written by Profs. Christina Piperi and Melinda T Coughlan. Prof. Christina Piperi from University of Athens Medical School, Greece, highlighted the link between glycation and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which is an important pathophysiology in various diseases. She summarized the novel effect of AGEs in induction of ER stress and the subsequent cell apoptosis in the endothelial cells. AGEs contribute to the enhancement of oxidative stress, inflammation, and metabolic abnormalities as well as ER stress, and thereby are intricately associated with the progression of AGE-related diseases. Prof. Melinda T Coughlan at Monash University, Australia, focused on the effect of dietary prebiotic supplementation for reduction of glycative stress. Prebiotics, which selectively stimulate the growth of beneficial bacteria in the human colon, might offer protection against AGE-induced pathology by the maintenance of gut barrier function and the reduction of oxidative stress, inflammation and insulin resistance.

This issue also includes the memorial articles by Dr. Keiichi Kimura at Meiji University, a winner of Young Investigator Award of the 22nd Japanese Maillard Reaction Society (JMARS) meeting held on December 21-22 in Tokyo last year. He demonstrated the effect of riboflavin as a novel glycation inhibitor, which decomposes the Amadori compound.

The IMARS Highlights editors look forward to submission of your articles related to glycation in the field of food and medical sciences as always. Please contact us!

Reiko Inagi, PhD
Division of Nephrology and Endocrinology
University of Tokyo, School of Medicine

email: [email protected]