Editorial Comment to the Januaryr 2016 Issue of IMARS Highlights

IMARS2016-3Editorial comments

IMARS committees would like to celebrate a happy and successful 2016 to all the members of IMARS. Our society will keep moving forward and we expect your continuous contribution to the IMARS. I, as an editor of the IMARS Highlights, promise that this on-line journal will provide you useful and exciting information about glycation research in different fields, from food science to medicine, to enjoy international and different-field exchange, and enhance collaboration.

                            The first issue of this year includes the meeting report of the 12th ISMR written by myself and two special articles written by the winners of Young Investigator Award of the 12th ISMR, Dr. Jürgen Löbner (food science) and Dr. Katrien H.J. Gaens (medical science) as continued from the last issue.

Dr. Jürgen Löbner at Institute of Food Chemistry, Technical University Dresden, Germany, received the award for his food science research on “Creatine is a scavenger for methylglyoxal in vivo and in food”. Dr. Katrien H.J. Gaens at Department of Internal Medicine, Maastricht University Medical Center, the Netherlands, got this award for the medical science research on “Plasma Levels of Ne-(carboxymethyl)lysine are inversely associated with central obesity and inflammation, and significantly explain a part of the central obesity-related increased in inflammation: the Hoorn and CODAM Studies” These young and active researchers will open a new avenue to advance science on the Maillard reaction and its biological significance.    

                            I deeply thank their great contributions to the IMARS Highlights. The IMARS Highlights editors always look forward to submission of your articles, comments to any kinds of issues published in IMARS Highlights and other glycation-related issues in the field of food and medical sciences.

 

Reiko Inagi, PhD
Division of Chronic Kidney Disease Pathophysiology,
The University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine

email: [email protected]

 

 

 

Editorial Comment to the November 2015 Issue of IMARS Highlights

2015Editorial comments

The 12th International Symposium on the Maillard Reaction (ISMR) was held in Ito International Research Center, the University of Tokyo, Japan, on September 1-4, 2015. The 12th ISMR meeting made us to update the scientific knowledge regarding food/medical glycation and to stimulate the international relationship in the Maillard reaction society. Thus, it was a very beneficial and constructive meeting. We will publish the meeting reports in the New Year issue of 2016.

This issue specially includes two articles written by the winners of Young Investigator Award of the 12th ISMR, Drs. Ossanna Nashalian (food science) and Kensei Taguchi (medical science).

Dr. Ossanna Nashalian at Department of Food Science and Agricultural Chemistry, McGill University, Quebec, Canada, received the award for her food science research on “the role of amino acid metal complexes in the Maillard and Akabori reactions”.

Dr. Kensei Taguchi at Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume, Japan, got this award for his medical science research on “RAGE-DNA aptamer improves aldosteron-induced renal injury in mice with hypertensive nephropathy”

These young and active researchers will open a new avenue to advance the science for Maillard reaction.    

I deeply thank their great contributions to the IMARS Highlights. The IMARS Highlights editors always look forward to submission of your articles, comments to any kinds of issues published in IMARS Highlights and other glycation-related issues in the field of food and medical sciences.

 

 

Reiko Inagi, PhD
Division of Chronic Kidney Disease Pathophysiology,
The University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine

email: [email protected]

 

12th ISMR Program, September 1-4, 2015

Program

Dear All Participants

Thank you very much for attending 12th International Symposium on the Maillard Reaction (ISMR).

We were able to have about 200 participants, and Young Investigator Awards (YIA) were awarded to four oral presenters and four poster presenters.

Presentations covered a broad range of topics and were very interesting and meaningful, so we had very active discussions there.

You can see photographs of 12th ISMR at right frame of this website.

We look forward to seeing you in the next ISMR held in Canada, 2018.

Teruo Miyazawa

President of 12th ISMR

 

 

Editorial Comment to the Special Issue of IMARS Highlights

2015Editorial comments

This is a special issue for the celebration of the 12th International Symposium on the Millard Reaction (ISMR) held in Tokyo (September 1-4, 2015), which is organized by IMARS and Japanese Society of Millard Reaction (JMARS). This issue is specially distributed to the participants of the ISMR.

In this special issue, we invited three presidents of the IMARS, who greatly contribute to the development of IMARS as well as food and medical sciences related to glycation: a former president, Professor Vincenzo Fogliano at Wageningen University (The Netherlands), a present president, Professor Teruo Miyazawa at Tohoku University (Japan), and a president-elect, Professor Varoujan Yaylayan at McGill University (Canada). They kindly wrote the meaningful and encouraging messages to all of the IMARS members, who are studying in the field of food science and medicine.

We believe that you will be able to find the important key words to enhance your scientific motivation from their massages based on the history and perspective of science of Millard reaction. 

 

Reiko Inagi, PhD
Division of Chronic Kidney Disease Pathophysiology,
The University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine

email: [email protected]

 

Editorial Comment to the July 2015 Issue of IMARS Highlights

2015Editorial comments

This issue publishes the updated evidence regarding the link between advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) and longevity, entitled “Drug repositioning to target aging and age-related diseases” by Dr. Mahesh J. Kulkarni at Division of Biochemical Sciences, CSIR-National Chemical Laboratory, India. Recently they found that rifampicin (RIF), which was developed initially as antibiotics, affects longevity by modifying transcription of genes and glycative stress. At the post-translational level, RIF reduces AGE formation (glycation) on major cellular proteins that control metabolism and support musculature. At the transcriptional level, RIF activates genes involved in aging, proteolysis, cell cycle and cellular detoxification. These multi-dimensional effects of RIF indicate the possibility of RIF as a drug for longevity and healthy super-aging society.

We also publish a summary of dicarbonyl stress, written by Prof. Naila Rabbani at Clinical Sciences Research Laboratories, Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK. Dicarbonyl stress is the abnormal accumulation of α-oxoaldehyde metabolites, including methylglyoxal, glyoxal, and 3-deoxyglucosone, all of which posttranslationally modify protein and DNA (glycation), and thereby contribute to cell and tissue dysfunction in aging and disease. This review highlights the pathogenesis of dicarbony stress, namely glycative stress, and the importance of glyoxalase as a defensive mechanism against dicarbony stress.

Please also pay attention to the 12th International Symposium on the Maillard Reaction (ISMR 12, http://www.imars.umin.jp/) meeting to be held in Tokyo on September 1-4. Members of the local committee and the international committee are devoting themselves to hold an outstanding meeting for participants and attendees. This will be a very important and exciting year for Maillard researchers, and please do not miss this rare opportunity for global liaison and fruitful collaboration with other colleagues of the society.

 

Reiko Inagi, PhD
Division of Chronic Kidney Disease Pathophysiology,
The University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine

email: [email protected]