Editorial Comment to the July 2015 Issue of IMARS Highlights

2015Editorial comments

This issue publishes the updated evidence regarding the link between advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) and longevity, entitled “Drug repositioning to target aging and age-related diseases” by Dr. Mahesh J. Kulkarni at Division of Biochemical Sciences, CSIR-National Chemical Laboratory, India. Recently they found that rifampicin (RIF), which was developed initially as antibiotics, affects longevity by modifying transcription of genes and glycative stress. At the post-translational level, RIF reduces AGE formation (glycation) on major cellular proteins that control metabolism and support musculature. At the transcriptional level, RIF activates genes involved in aging, proteolysis, cell cycle and cellular detoxification. These multi-dimensional effects of RIF indicate the possibility of RIF as a drug for longevity and healthy super-aging society.

We also publish a summary of dicarbonyl stress, written by Prof. Naila Rabbani at Clinical Sciences Research Laboratories, Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK. Dicarbonyl stress is the abnormal accumulation of α-oxoaldehyde metabolites, including methylglyoxal, glyoxal, and 3-deoxyglucosone, all of which posttranslationally modify protein and DNA (glycation), and thereby contribute to cell and tissue dysfunction in aging and disease. This review highlights the pathogenesis of dicarbony stress, namely glycative stress, and the importance of glyoxalase as a defensive mechanism against dicarbony stress.

Please also pay attention to the 12th International Symposium on the Maillard Reaction (ISMR 12, http://www.imars.umin.jp/) meeting to be held in Tokyo on September 1-4. Members of the local committee and the international committee are devoting themselves to hold an outstanding meeting for participants and attendees. This will be a very important and exciting year for Maillard researchers, and please do not miss this rare opportunity for global liaison and fruitful collaboration with other colleagues of the society.

 

Reiko Inagi, PhD
Division of Chronic Kidney Disease Pathophysiology,
The University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine

email: [email protected]

 

Editorial Comment to the May 2015 Issue of IMARS Highlights

 2015Editorial comments

The May issue (2015) publishes a comment on the AGE research, entitled “AGE: the vital point to healthy life in the aging society”, written by Prof. Masaomi Nangaku at the University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. In Japan, the super-aging society associated with kidney aging exacerbates development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD): one out of 8 adults suffers from CKD and the number of CKD patients is rapidly increasing. Accumulating evidence emphasize that the link between aging and glycative stress, namely accumulation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) and subsequent induction of stress signals to glycative stress, is an important point to disturb the kidney homeostasis and super-aging society. It strongly suggests that AGE research remains one of the most exciting areas in medicine, especially translational medicine contributes to healthy and active super-aging society.
We also publishes a mini review, entitled “Poor bone quality in diabetes”, written by Prof. Mitsuru Saito at Jikei University School of Medicine, Japan. This review summarizes the up-to-date mechanisms how bone cell homeostasis is affected by AGEs and the impact of the AGE formation inhibitors to reduce fracture risk in diabetic patients. Diabetic complications, including fracture, are closely associated with the decrease in quality of health and poor prognosis. This review also emphasizes the importance of AGE research on healthy and active super-aging society.
Please also pay attention to the 12th International Symposium on the Maillard Reaction (ISMR 12, http://www.imars.umin.jp/) meeting to be held in Tokyo on September 1-4. Members of the local committee and the international committee are devoting themselves to hold an outstanding meeting for participants and attendees. This will be a very important and exciting year for Maillard researchers, and please do not miss this rare opportunity for global liaison and fruitful collaboration with other colleagues of the society.

 

Reiko Inagi, PhD
Division of Chronic Kidney Disease Pathophysiology,
The University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine

 

 

12th ISMR

12th ISMR

First of all, I would like to thank all of you for continuing contribution and support on International Maillard society (IMARS). I am honored to serve as the President of IMARS and hold the 12th International Symposium on the Maillard Reaction (12th ISMR).

The 1st ISMR was held in 1979, in Uddevalla Sweden. Since then, we have had fulfilling symposiums in many different countries. This time, I would like to organize the next symposium in 2015, in Tokyo Japan. I believe that the next one will provide a great opportunity for an active discussion and contribute further study. In addition, you could explore chic city Tokyo and experience “the washoku”, traditional Japanese food, which is now UNESCO world intangible cultural heritage. I surely believe that it will benefit your career outputs and will also leave you with some wonderful memories. I look forward to meeting you in Tokyo.

 

Chair, Organizing Committee of 12th ISMR

IMARS President

Teruo Miyazawa

Professor, Tohoku University, Japan

Click here to 12th ISMR

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12th ISMR first circular

Editorial Comment to the March 2015 Issue of IMARS Highlights

2015Editorial comments

In this issue, we invited Dr. So Motoyoshi at Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kanazawa, Japan. It is known that advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) bind to the receptor for AGE (RAGE) and induce inflammation. He and Prof. Yamamoto’s group recently demonstrated that an increase in cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) suppresses inflammation via RAGE both in vivo and in vitro. This article emphasizes not only the pathophysiological importance of RAGE-AGE pathway in RAGE-related diseases but also a possibility of novel approaches based on RAGE to these diseases.    

We also published the Young Investigation Award abstract of Japanese Society of Maillard Reaction (JMARS) written by Dr. Jun-ichi Shirakawa, who received the Young Investigator Award of the 24nd JMARS meeting held on November 7-8 in Kumamoto last year, at School of Agriculture, Tokai University. He and Prof. Nagai’s group reported the impact of AGE measurement on diagnosis of metabolic disorders.

Please also pay attention to the 12th International Symposium on the Maillard Reaction (ISMR 12) meeting to be held in Tokyo on September 1-4. Members of the local committee and the international committee are devoting themselves to hold an outstanding meeting for participants and attendees. This will be a very important and exciting year for Maillard researchers, and please do not miss this rare opportunity for global liaison and fruitful collaboration with other colleagues of the society.

 

Reiko Inagi, PhD

 

Division of Chronic Kidney Disease Pathophysiology,

The University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine

email: [email protected]

 

 

 

 

Editorial Comment to the January 2015 Issue of IMARS Highlights

2015Editorial comments

On behalf of the IMARS president, Prof. Miyazawa, we wish all of Maillard reaction researchers a very happy and successful 2015. As we announced previously, we will have the 12th International Symposium on the Maillard Reaction (ISMR 12) meeting in Tokyo on September 1-4. Members of the local committee and the international committee are devoting themselves to hold an outstanding meeting for participants and attendees. This will be a very important and exciting year for Maillard researchers, and please do not miss this rare opportunity for global liaison and fruitful collaboration with other colleagues of the society.

              As a special mini review of the New Year issue, we invited Prof. Shinji Kume at Shiga University of Medical Science, Shiga, Japan, to summarize the updated information of autophagy in diabetes and kidney disease. Autophagy is an important intracellular catabolic pathway to degrade proteins or damaged organelles and recycle amino acids. Thus, autophagy can maintain the protein homeostasis (proteostasis). Under hyperglycemic conditions, the catabolic activity of autophagic pathway is deranged and contributes to maladaptation to diabetic stress via the loss of protein quality, especially accumulation of unfavorable proteins/organelles. This review highlights the novel pathophysiological significance of glycation on protein homeostasis via autophagy.   

We also published the Young Investigation Award abstract of Japanese Society of Maillard Reaction (JMARS) written by Dr. Sachie Kato, who received the Young Investigator Award of the 24nd JMARS meeting held on November 7-8 in Kumamoto last year, at Department of Agricultural Chemistry, Meiji University.

The IMARS Highlights editors look forward to your contribution to the field of food and medical glycation researches as always. Please contact us.

 

Reiko Inagi, PhD

 

Division of Chronic Kidney Disease Pathophysiology,

The University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine

email: [email protected]